Help for hypoglycemics?

On July 30, 2010, in Uncategorized, by Andrea


One of my "high's"

There is extensive work being done to help diabetics’ lives easier.  The flipside is that the same research can be used to help hypoglycemics’ lives easier as well.. especially those who tend to drop very rapidly and without warning.

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Live in Cinci and hypoglycemic?

On January 19, 2010, in Uncategorized, by Andrea

Go be a labrat.

UC HEALTH LINE: Be Aware of Blood Sugar Post Gastric Bypass

CINCINNATI—People with type 2 diabetes who have gastric bypass surgery often leave the hospital without the need for previously prescribed diabetes medications.

Researchers and doctors believe this health benefit is related to changes in the body’s circulating hormones—particularly an increase of insulin secretion. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of glucose (sugar) in the blood.

Marzieh Salehi, MD, a diabetologist with UC Health University of Cincinnati Physicians whose research is focused on the effect of weight-loss surgery on glucose metabolism, cautions that although there can be huge benefits for diabetic patients who undergo gastric bypass surgery, a group of patients experience severely low levels of blood sugar (hypoglycemia)—especially following a meal and typically several years after surgery. Symptoms of hypoglycemia often aren’t recognized until they become debilitating or life-threatening.

Salehi says that many patients with type 2 diabetes who qualify for gastric bypass surgery rely on anti-diabetic medications like insulin injections to regulate glucose in the body. These same patients often leave the hospital following surgery with normal glucose control without taking any medications.

“It’s possible,” says Salehi, “that gastric bypass increases gut hormone secretion or nervous system activity, which in turn increases insulin secretion and improves glucose metabolism in a majority of patients after surgery.

“However,” she adds, “there is a population of gastric bypass patients who, following surgery, develop high levels of endogenous insulin secretion, resulting in dangerously low glucose levels, or hypoglycemia. These glucose abnormalities due to too much insulin secretion represent an extreme effect of gastric bypass surgery.”

Salehi, who sees weight-loss surgery patients with glucose abnormalities at the UC Health Diabetes Center, says symptoms of hypoglycemia include shakiness, sweating, dizziness, light-headedness, weakness, confusion and difficulty speaking. More severe symptoms include seizure and cognitive abnormalities. Hypoglycemia can be life-threatening without proper monitoring or treatment.

“If hypoglycemia goes unnoticed, the body can become accustomed to low sugar and patients can then lose their awareness to low sugar. It is essential to seek help if any of these symptoms develop after gastric bypass surgery.”

Salehi is currently conducting a National Institutes of Health-sponsored study to determine how glucose metabolism is affected by gastric bypass surgery. For more information, call Leslie Baum, registered nurse and study coordinator, at (513) 558-0201.

To schedule an appointment with the UC Health Diabetes Center, call (513) 475-8200.

A tattoo that tells blood sugars?

On November 14, 2009, in General Nutrition, by Andrea

It may be on it’s way…

Source: MSNBC

Scientists are starting to test a kind of sensor that changes color with rising blood sugar levels. The high-tech tattoo, which is about the size of the clicker on the end of a ballpoint pen, is made up of tiny spheres that are injected into the outermost layer of skin. These nanospheres contain a special kind of ink that reacts with glucose, explains the tattoo’s inventor, Heather Clark, a biomedical engineer at Draper Laboratory in Cambridge, Mass.

What would be cool is if this could be used for those of us that are severely hypoglycemic rather than diabetic.  Some of us don’t even begin to get symptomatic until comatose levels — quite recently, I remember a reading of 28 on my glucometer — a number that would have many people unconscious and drooling on the floor.  If I had this implantable mood ring of sorts, I could save myself some of the misery that I encounter at such low numbers and try to head off the hours it takes to gradually get those numbers normal without doing a massive yo-yo of reactive-ness (yes, I am now making up my own words).

A girl can dream, right?